About

bcm300Brian is a lifelong cyclist and started serious touring at the age of 16 when he completed his 1st 1000 mile solo tour. Brian built up his first custom road touring bike in 1977 and got involved in mountain biking in 1984 with a Ross Mt. Rainier which he still rides.

A long time member of IMBA who attended the 1st National Summit at the Biosphere in Oracle Arizona, Brian is also a Life Member of the  Adventure Cycling Association and completed Adventure Cycling’s Leadership Training Course. Using Adventure Cycling’s maps, he has crossed the country coast to coast, border to border and has logged too many other adventures to count.

Brian is a bicycling Tour Leader for both Adventure Cycling Association headquartered in Missoula MT, and Wilderness Voyageurs of Ohiopyle PA.

His stable of bikes include singles, tandems, touring, road, mountain, recumbent, fatbike, geared, single-speed and combinations thereof.  He dreams of learning to ride a unicycle someday … and there’s a motorcycle in his life he calls “The Beast” for good reason.

Cars are cages.

Brian’s doctor claims he is “freakishly healthy”, which Brian attributes to a life of cycling as a lifestyle. He is constantly planning his next bike adventure.

A life firmly rooted in biking … Bike Roots.

2 thoughts on “About”

  1. hey, loved your commentary on riding the south-north route of the GDR on a fatbike. (Two nights ago, we had a divide rider from Maine stay over with us during the impending thunder storm-worried about lightning strikes since two hikers were struck and killed in R Mtn Nat Park in two consecutive days).

    I’m considering a similar route on a Mukluk next year (over my Moots YBB softtail) but concerned about flatting, goathead thorns in NM requiring frequent and many fat tire tubes. The traction on dirt with fat tires is incredible and now I’m running tubes without Stan’s but know the tubeless option has become available. insight/comments?

    Also, I live in northern Colorado and thinking of Mexico to Steamboat Spgs first in spring and then Banff to SS (north to south) two weeks later (that route may keep the family obligations and start location/no need for vehicle drop off-re pick up, more acceptable).
    insight/comments?

    thanks again for sharing your blog and commentary. Dave

    1. Hi Dave,

      Thanks for writing!

      Coincidentally, Rick Shauvin completed a border-to-border S-to-N GDMBR just a couple days ago on a Mukluk. His journal is on CGOAB at:

      http://www.crazyguyonabike.com/doc/14043

      He read my journal (http://www.crazyguyonabike.com/doc/sunsandsnowsky) about doing it on a Pugsley and figured a FatBike might be the way to go.

      Like any bike/setup, there are trade-offs, but I thoroughly enjoyed it. I had next to ZERO problems with the bike … only two flats on the entire trip. Amazing. I DID use tubes but filled them with (8 oz each) Stans, so I can’t say I was “just lucky”. Stans appears to work well. I carried a spare tube plus patches. I had no interest in going tubeless as I wasn’t keen on pulling an air compressor with me in the back country (grin) and I’m not a racer by any means, so speed/performance was of no concern. What mattered to me was reliability, comfort, traction and control in ALL conditions. Mission accomplished!

      Your Moots would be a great ride too. If you take your Mukluk, I’ll be happy to baby-sit your Moots while you’re gone! 😉

      Your scheme to do it in two sections for logistic reasons makes good sense. Lot’s of people do the ride in sections, but for me, the “experience” was about doing it uninterrupted. I had to travel big distances to get out and back anyhow. No easy solution.

      Let me know if you do a journal on CGOAB … I’d love to follow along!

      Rubber Side Down!
      b

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Life Behind Bars